Leather Plane

I often use tools that are traditionally for wood for other tasks in the shop. I don't mean opening finish cans with my chisels or anything like that. Normally it's edge tools that are designed for wood on other materials like plastic or leather. I discovered years ago that chisels and planes are great for cutting leather as you see here on this mallet head. But don't even try it with dull tools or you'll make a big mess of the leather. As well, you should use a low-angle plane like a block plane to sever the fibers more easily. This mallet will eventually be making its way into my book 'The Minimalist Woodworker' as an assembly mallet but it's good for more than just whacking wood together, or apart for that matter.
I use a lot of leather in my shop <snickers>. Every tool or vise that holds wood in place has leather lining the surfaces to protect the wood. Leather also adds more friction to hold things in place without a ton of clamping force. Dogs, holdfasts, vise jaws and stops all have a layer of protection.
So perhaps you should add some leather to your shop and if your plane is sharp enough, you can make some beautiful end-grain leather shavings.

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